Healthy Byte: Can’t Out Gym Poor Eating Choices

Aside from those who has youth on their side or are the lucky few to be genetically programmed to repel fat, the above statement holds true for most. And it is perhaps the most difficult hard truth to accept and implement. The assumption of exercise negates everything & anything one consume is folly. Below is an excerpt from an expert explaining why it is folly:

But what many people don’t realize is that it’s much easier to cut excess calories from your diet than it is to burn them off with extra activity, says Natalie Digate Muth, MD, RDN, senior adviser for health-care solutions for the American Council on Exercise. Take a 20-ounce bottle of Coca-Cola, for example. It may only take a few minutes to guzzle those 240 calories, but you’d have to walk or run nearly 2½ miles to burn them off.

So unless you’re a professional athlete, you’re probably not exercising enough to cancel out an all-you-can-eat diet.

SOURCE: HERE

Still not a believer? Here’s more expert explanation:

Narula said that because of misconceptions about weight loss, people often overeat and assume that they can burn off the excess calories at the gym. But “it’s easier to take out the calories than to try and burn them off,” she said. For example, for an individual with a daily caloric intake of 3,500 to drop a pound of fat, it would take one and a half times as long to lose weight through exercise burning 200 calories per day than through cutting 500 calories a day from their diet.

“That’s either an hour or an hour and a half at the gym on the treadmill, on the rowing machine; or it’s cutting out a couple sodas, a bagel with cream cheese, a cupcake,” Narula said.

SOURCE: HERE

The bottom line is, unless you are Dwayne ‘The Rock’ Johnson who’s job is to stay fit and gets paid to invest hours a day at the gym, for most of us everyday folks there simply isn’t enough hours in the day to out exercise poor eating choices.

 

2016 1-29

As Albert Einstein definitely said, “For every cheeseburger ingested, an equal and opposite cheeseburger must occur somewhere.” What Einstein knew intuitively was that diet matters; what goes in must go out, or else it will turn into love handles. That’s just science.

So we decided to look at the number of calories in 13 commonly consumed foods and drinks, and evaluate how many steps (and miles) it would take to walk off those calories. We used an average of 2,000 steps for a mile, and about 89 calories burned per mile walked. No, these are not perfect measurements; yes, these estimates will depend on your height, weight, gender, atmospheric conditions, etc.

Next time you’re thinking of grabbing an on-the-go meal, better make sure your boots were made for walking.

Credit: Nina Gonzales/Thrillist

Credit: Nina Gonzales/Thrillist

Credit: Nina Gonzales/Thrillist

Credit: Nina Gonzales/Thrillist

Credit: Nina Gonzales/Thrillist

Credit: Nina Gonzales/Thrillist

Credit: Nina Gonzales/Thrillist

 

Originally Posted HERE

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Healthy Byte: Day 1120

I apologize for my absence in posting these but life as it is has been dominating my every waking moment. And when it’s not I rejuvenate at the gym so that I refrain from committing a felony (I kid) … (sorta) … (no, seriously just kidding) … (kinda).

Anywho I thought I’d take this opportunity to share my top NSVs 1120 days in:

NSV #1 – After 3 plus years of reducing my sugar intake I can proudly & finally say that I 100% free from drinking added sugar regularly.

Remember this? IMAG2622

Over the weekend I was finally able to bid farewell my psychological spoonful of sugar in my tea (the smallest one “DASH”) . I now drink tea with just a dash of organic skim milk and am proud to say that I do not drink any additional sugar. YAY!

NSV #2 – Remember this? Hanging leg raises – hardcore abs burner. 

What I managed …   

The first time I tried a hanging leg raise I just hung there … like grandma underwear on the clothes line.  Not only did I not have the physical strength to do anything without risking falling but I was also too afraid to move for fear of failling. SO I literally started the hanging leg lifts by hanging there … like an idiot. I was SO embarrassed that I actually took it out of my routine until I felt stronger. A few months later when I tried it again I was pleasantly surprised with my watered down version: It’s a far cry from the full version but it is a mark improvement from just imitating laundry, no? 

NSV #3 – I am finally loosening my death grip on that little number on the scale because my focus has changed. I will still weigh in every 4-6 weeks but my focus now is more on increase muscle. Parting ways emotionally with the scale has been & remains one of my biggest hurdles in maintenance because for over 3 years now weight has been my one & only marker for progress / continued success. And although it has served me well, in maintenance I have found it to be more of a nuisance and not all that helpful in some cases.

SO for now I will be focusing more on the tape measure and this little guy   (body fat pincher). I am chosing to focus on building muscles (not bulking) because unfortunately muscle deterioration is a part of aging. However it is not an inevitable phenomena which cannot be undone. On the contrary science has shown that at the very minimum the erosion can be halted if not somewhat reversed. As I have mentioned many times before, I think many are still stuck on the thought that “strength training” = “weight lifting / bodybuilding” and it does not. There are a multitude of ways to strength train, from isometric holds, to body weight (resistance), to yes, outright weight lifting. The choice is largely dependent on the individual goals, time, and lifestyle. So I think of my choices as this: I can either continue to decrease my caloric intake to compensate for less muscles to burn calories with OR I can maintain or increase the muscles I have in order to maximize the benefits of a healthy lifestyle. I choose the ladder.  I will still do my BBWOB resistance cardio but I will continue incorporate additional body weight strength training in order to continue to transition away from ‘weight’ as holy grail of continued success.

 

Some articles on the benefits / importance of strength training: HERE , HERE , or HERE

 

Some sample strength training routines to get you started:

Isometric Holds

http://greatist.com/move/isometric-exercises

http://www.sparkpeople.com/resource/fitness_articles.asp?id=972&page=3

Body Weight

http://www.menshealth.com/fitness/bodyweight-circuit-workout

http://www.bodybuilding.com/fun/becker20.htm

 

Weight Lifting

http://www.mayoclinic.org/healthy-lifestyle/fitness/expert-answers/weight-training/faq-20058479

Healthy Byte: Man Boobs

All Photo Courtesy of Getty Images

Man boobs can creep up on anyone. Although usually a direct result of carrying excess body fat, they can also happen when your testosterone levels dip too low and your estrogen levels get too high, a medical condition called gynecomastia. That’s why even lean guys can get big breasts. In most cases, though, these two causes aren’t mutually exclusive. “Excess adipose fat produces aromatase, an enzyme that converts testosterone to the female hormone estradiol, which can cause man boobs to form,” says Pete McCall, a personal trainer and spokesman for the American Council on Exercise.

Regardless of why you have man boobs, the best way to get rid of them is through exercise and other lifestyle changes — not with Low-T drugs. “One reason we see so many ads for testosterone-replacement gels and creams is it’s much easier to use one of these products than to do the work,” says McCall. But given all of the negative health effects linked to Low T drugs — namely increased risk of blood clots, heart attack, and stroke — try these eight natural solutions instead.

Get moving.

If you’re not currently getting intense cardiovascular exercise at least three days a week, that’s the very first thing you must change. Once you’ve committed to regular running, cycling, or any other type of cardio, McCall says you should start losing flab all over, which will also help shrink your doughy chest.

Ramp up your workouts.

If you’re already hitting the gym yet you’re still sporting boobs, crank up the intensity of your workouts. “So many guys get too busy and only go to the gym just a few days a week, doing the same routine every time without really pushing themselves,” McCall says. “You need to go hard — to the point of fatigue, to where you’re out of breath. That will signal to your body that it needs to produce more testosterone to help repair muscles.” Generating more testosterone, in turn, will get your hormonal balance back where it should be to help zap those man boobs. McCall recommends interval training such as alternating sprinting and jogging on the treadmill or taking a challenging cycling class.

Hit the pool.

Any kind of intense cardio can help, but swimming can be particularly good for guys with man boobs because it’s more of a total-body workout than, say, using the StairMaster. “Any time you can get all of your muscle mass involved with an exercise, the total amount of energy you burn goes way up,” McCall explains. He says the breast stroke and freestyle can be especially effective.

Lift more, lift longer.

McCall says strength training also generates testosterone to help with your boob situation. If you already lift, chances are you’re not hoisting heavy enough weights or going until you can’t possibly do one more rep. “Break out of your normal routine by increasing the amount of weight you lift each time and not stopping until you’re fatigued,” McCall says. “This will cause more damage to your muscles and tell your body it needs more testosterone to help with repair.”

Get off the bench.

Rather than bench presses or other lifting exercises for which you lay or sit down, McCall recommends standing workouts with heavier weights, such as barbell squats, deadlifts, and bent-over barbell rows. When you stand, you recruit more muscles throughout your body to help hold you up, which will produce more testosterone. McCall says this is the main reason why CrossFit devotees are so ripped.

Do pushups.

McCall also suggests push-ups for whittling away man boobs because they too involve many muscles and require you to support your own body weight. He says using a TRX or other suspension device to do these will engage even more chest muscles than doing push-ups on the floor. Change up your grip pattern — a wider grip will target more of your chest fibers while a narrower grip will hit the triceps and shoulders.

Try a standing cable fly.

This exercise targets the pectoral muscles specifically. Stretch out your arms to either side, grab the stirrups or handles on a cable, bend forward slightly, and squeeze your hands together toward the middle of your chest. You can also try an alternate-arm cable fly. “Hold your right arm straight out in front of you and slowly draw your left arm out to the side and back to the middle, then switch arms,” says McCall. “Be sure to go slow with each movement because that’ll keep the muscle under tension for longer and signal more repair to that site.”

Get more sleep.

“We produce testosterone when we sleep, so if you’re consistently stressed out and getting only five hours, like many men do, your body won’t make enough testosterone,” McCall says. Make sure you’re taking time to de-stress in the evenings, minding your booze intake, and laying off the caffeine after noon so you can get ample good-quality slumber.

Originally Posted HERE

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Healthy Byte: Increase Strength without Moving a Muscle

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Some fitness trends make it seem like in order to get in shape, you have to bounce around like crazy, throw tires into the air, or leave a pool of sweat on the ground after every workout. But believe it or not, you can build serious strength—without even moving a muscle.

It’s called isometrics. In these exercises, your muscles tense up, but don’t actually move. Say what? Imagine pressing your hands together in a prayer position as hard as you can for 10 seconds. You’ll feel tension in your chest and arms, yet your arms didn’t move at all. There—you just did an isometric exercise. Holding a plank is another example you’re likely familiar with. And if you’ve ever taken a barre class, you know how hard it can be to simply hold still while your muscles are contracted.

In positions like these, the muscle fibers are activated but since there are equal forces against each other, there is no movement. (Compare this to picking up a 20-pound dumbbell to do biceps curls—the force of the weight pushing down is less than the force you are using to lift the weight up.)

With isometrics, you can take a break from jumping on boxes, lifting heavy weights, or doing endless crunches (your lower back will thank you). And the best part? Isometric exercises have been found to helptake off inches around your waist, increase overall strength, and even decrease high blood pressure.

Besides that, you don’t need any equipment, and they’re actually fun! So if you’re looking to take a break from yet another set of heavy lifting, chill out and stay home. Be sure to follow these four tips to get the most out of the isometrics workout below.

1. Squeeze it—real good.

Since you’re not relying on movement to fatigue your muscles, you’ve got to squeeze them hard. The technical term for this is “maximal voluntary contraction,” which means you should tighten up your muscles as much as you can.

Yet when doing isometrics, you don’t need to give 100 percent of your maximum effort each time. Research shows that benefits can occur at about 60 to 80 percent of your max effort. Isn’t that a relief for anyone sick of hearing “go beastmode!” before every set?

2. Take a deep breath.

When doing isometric exercises, the natural tendency is to forget to breathe. Tightening up your muscles can also lead to tightening up your breathing, but don’t do it. You’ll get red in the face and scare your roommate.

Breathing should be done from the lower belly, which should get bigger when you breathe in. Try it: Place your left thumb in your belly button and rest your left palm over your lower belly. Now place your right hand over your left hand. Close your eyes and breathe deeply. Feel your hands rising and falling. Inhale for 5 counts and exhale for 5 counts. That’s the type of breathing you should be doing during your isometric exercises.

3. Assume the position.

Form is very important in isometric exercises. You hear trainers talk about proper form all the time, since poor form can lead to injury. Say you’re bench pressing 100 pounds with poor form—the extra weight could cause damage to your shoulders or low back.

In isometrics, you don’t have a ton of weight pushing against you so it’s difficult to get injured, but positioning is still important. Research has shown that varying the angles when doing isometrics increases muscle strength. If you only do the same posture over and over again, you’ll not only look like a human statue, you will also be limiting the benefits you receive. So switch it up. For example: When you place your arm in a 90-degree angle and tense up, you’re strengthening the biceps muscle at one length. Try also positioning your arm at a 120-degree or 45-degree angle.

4. Mix it up.

It’s the million-dollar question: Should you throw out your running shoes and let the dog start chewing on your resistance bands in favor of only isometric exercises? No way. Isometrics are another tool you can add to your toolbox to help you live a healthier, more energetic, and fitter life.

To achieve optimal health, various exercises should be used to achieve various goals. For example, aerobics are better than isometrics for improving cardiovascular health. And if you’re looking for bigger muscles, you won’t want to do isometrics exclusively. Lifting progressively heavier weights is one of the best approaches to building massive size and hypertrophy.

Ready to get started? Below are seven of my favorite isometric exercises that’ll work the entire body.

1. Bent-Over Press Against Wall

  • Common mistake: forgetting to breathe
  • Muscles worked: shoulders

2. Prayer Pose

  • Common mistake: Raising your shoulders while you push can cause unnecessary strain on your shoulders.
  • Muscles worked: chest

3. High Plank

  • Common mistake: keeping your butt too high or too low during the movement
  • Muscles worked: core, back

4. Self Arm Wrestling

  • Common mistake: tensing your shoulders
  • Muscles worked: biceps and triceps

5. Triceps Extension Against Wall

  • Common mistake: tensing shoulders and not breathing deeply enough
  • Muscles worked: triceps

6. Forearm Plank

  • Common mistake: letting your butt fall down or hiking your butt too high in the air; your shoulders, hips, knees and ankles should be in line
  • Muscles worked: abs

7. Low Squat

  • Common mistake: not sitting back far enough (try not to allow your knees to go over your toes)
  • Muscles worked: glutes, quads, adductors

The Total-Body Isometric Workout

Perform 3 reps of each exercise below, contracting for 10 seconds in each rep. If your goal is fat loss, use less force (60 to 70 percent of your max contraction) and take short rest periods between (20 to 30 seconds). If you’re doing it for strength and muscle growth, you should use more force (80 to 90 percent of your max contraction) and take longer rest periods between sets (45 to 60 seconds).

  • Bent-Over Press Against Wall
  • Prayer Pose
  • High Plank
  • Self Arm Wrestling (each side)
  • Triceps Extension Against Wall
  • Low Plank
  • Low Squat

This is a great routine you can add as a finisher or even as a short full-body workout you do in the morning before you head to work.

Originally Posted HERE

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Healthy Byte: New Year Resolution Special Edition Part 2

As everyone pours into the gym for their New Year Resolutions, here’s the second half of the equation to get healthy … a person’s nutritional intake. There’s simply isn’t enough hours in a day to out-gym poor eating and although I personally do not advocate a particular “diet” many will go this route first. And if done correctly, some will see great results. So I thought this would be some good info to share for those who are going to the gym but have no idea where to start in regards to their nutrition. Always keep in mind that which ever eating approach you choose the more drastic the more difficult transition to maintenance may be & vice versa. Best of luck!

U.S.News & World Report Reveals the 2016 Best Diets Rankings

Washington, D.C. – Jan. 5, 2016 – U.S. News & World Report today released the 2016 Best Diets, a web portal featuring rankings and information on longstanding and new diet plans to help the estimated 45 million Americans who diet each year – and millions more globally – achieve healthier lifestyles. U.S. News’ panel of health experts ranked 38 diets, naming DASH (Dietary Approaches to Stop Hypertension) the Best Overall Diet for the sixth year in a row. The MIND (Mediterranean-DASH Intervention for Neurodegenerative Delay) diet, a new addition to the 2016 list, follows at No. 2, tied with the TLC (Therapeutic Lifestyle Changes) diet. Weight Watchers continues to be the No. 1 Weight-Loss Diet and is tied with the Mayo Clinic Diet as the Best Commercial Diet. In the inaugural ranking of Fast Weight-Loss Diets, the HMR program and Biggest Loser Diet tie at No. 1.

In addition to the MIND diet, U.S. News added two other diets to the 2016 rankings: the Whole30 diet and the Fertility Diet. The MIND diet, credited with preserving cognitive abilities, takes two proven diets – DASH and Mediterranean – and zeroes in on foods that promote brain health. The plan takes a top rank on the main list in part because it is also the No. 1 Easiest Diet to Follow, tied with Weight Watchers and the Fertility Diet. The Fertility Diet, which claims certain changes in diet, weight and activity can help you get pregnant faster, also debuts as the No. 1 Diet for Diabetes partly because of its elimination of trans fats.

The Whole30 diet, a 30-day program that bans processed foods, legumes, grains, dairy, alcohol and added sugar, ranks at No. 38 on the overall list – a spot previously held by two other popular diets, Paleo and the Dukan Diet. The Raw Food diet and Atkins are also at the bottom of rankings categories like the Best Diets for Healthy Eating, and are tied at No. 34 on the main list. At No. 38 in the Easiest Diets to Follow category, Raw Food was deemed the most difficult diet to follow.

“Our rankings put hard numbers on the belief that no one diet is ideal for everybody, but the best food plans overall are sustainable,” said Angela Haupt, senior health editor at U.S. News. “Besides the rankings and data, each diet has a detailed profile that includes how it works, evidence that supports or refutes its claims and a nutritional snapshot – tools that, along with the advice of a physician or nutritionist, can help consumers invest in diets that suit their lifestyles and further their health and wellness goals.”

 U.S. News’ panel of health experts includes nutritionists and physicians specializing in diabetes, heart health and weight loss, who scored each diet for short- and long-term weight loss, ease of compliance, safety and nutrition. Diets were ranked in nine categories, including diabetes and heart disease prevention and control, as well as easiness to follow and likelihood of weight loss. For further details on how the rankings were calculated, see the methodology.

U.S. News 2016 Best Diets Rankings

*See the full lists here

Best Diets Overall

1. DASH Diet
2. MIND Diet
2. TLC Diet

Best Commercial Diets

1. Mayo Clinic Diet
1. Weight Watchers
3. Jenny Craig

For Weight Loss

1. Weight Watchers
2. HMR Program
3. Biggest Loser Diet
3. Jenny Craig
3. Raw Food Diet

For Fast Weight Loss

1. Biggest Loser
1. HMR Program
3. Atkins
3. Weight Watchers

Easiest To Follow

1. Fertility Diet
1. MIND Diet
1. Weight Watchers

For Healthy Eating

1. DASH Diet
2. TLC Diet
3. Mediterranean Diet
3. MIND Diet

For Diabetes

1. Fertility Diet
2. Biggest Loser Diet
2. DASH Diet

For Heart Health

1. Ornish Diet
2. TLC Diet
3. DASH Diet

Plant-Based

1. Mediterranean Diet
2. Flexitarian Diet
3. Ornish Diet

Media Contact: Sophia Sherry, ssherry@usnews.com, (U.S.) +1-202-955-2031.

About U.S. News & World Report

U.S. News & World Report is a global digital news and information company that empowers people to make better, more informed decisions about important issues affecting their lives. Focusing on Education, Health, Personal Finance, Travel, Cars and News & Opinion, www.usnews.com provides consumer advice, rankings, news and analysis to serve people making complex decisions throughout all stages of life. 30 million people visit www.usnews.com each month for research and guidance. Founded in 1933, U.S. News is headquartered in Washington, D.C.

Originally Posted HERE

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Healthy Byte: New Year Resolution Special Edition Part 1

I apologize in advance for the wall of text post but thought that the USDA new 2015-2020 Dietary Guidelines issued on Jan 7, 2016 was worthy of a Healthy Byte special edition two-parter post.

It’s important to note that the recommended daily total caloric intake is based on the average adult of average age & average height. So if you are not within the average group the data was based on you may very well be eating not enough or too much. Therefore I always recommend to take the USDA guidelines with a grain of salt, so-to-speak. The recommendations are a good fodder for tweaking macro nutrients. However, in lieu of the total daily caloric recommendation I’d strongly encourage you to calculate it based on your sex, age, level of activity, and goals using any number of online nutrition calculators. My personal favorite is this IIFYM TDEE / BMR calculator HERE. [TDEE is Total Daily Energy Expenditure – this is how much fuel the body needs according to how active you are. BMR is Basal Metabolic Rate – which is the bare minimum fuel your body needs if you were to wake up & just lay in bed doing nothing]. Both very important to at least be mildly aware of and serves as a good starting point for most.

I rerun my TDEE # every year on my birthday to ensure that I am not over eating for my age, height, and level of activity. One of the most interesting aspect of the USDA guidelines is it’s note on “eating patterns” rather than specific list of dos & don’ts which I think is a huge step in the right direction. No one becomes overweight with one candy bar or one soda. It is a continued pattern of eating calorie dense – nutritionally poor foods over time which eventually comes back to haunt us. So I hope you’ll find this helpful.

Over the past century, deficiencies of essential nutrients have dramatically decreased, many infectious diseases have been conquered, and the majority of the U.S. population can now anticipate a long and productive life. At the same time, rates of chronic diseases—many of which are related to poor quality diet and physical inactivity—have increased. About half of all American adults have one or more preventable, diet-related chronic diseases, including cardiovascular disease, type 2 diabetes, and overweight and obesity.

However, a large body of evidence now shows that healthy eating patterns and regular physical activity can help people achieve and maintain good health and reduce the risk of chronic disease throughout all stages of the lifespan. The 2015-2020 Dietary Guidelines for Americans reflects this evidence through its recommendations.

The Dietary Guidelines is required under the 1990 National Nutrition Monitoring and Related Research Act, which states that every 5 years, the U.S. Departments of Health and Human Services (HHS) and of Agriculture (USDA) must jointly publish a report containing nutritional and dietary information and guidelines for the general public. The statute (Public Law 101-445, 7 U.S.C. 5341 et seq.) requires that the Dietary Guidelines be based on the preponderance of current scientific and medical knowledge. The 2015-2020 edition of the Dietary Guidelines builds from the 2010 edition with revisions based on the Scientific Report of the 2015 Dietary Guidelines Advisory Committee and consideration of Federal agency and public comments.

The Dietary Guidelines is designed for professionals to help all individuals ages 2 years and older and their families consume a healthy, nutritionally adequate diet. The information in the Dietary Guidelines is used in developing Federal food, nutrition, and health policies and programs. It also is the basis for Federal nutrition education materials designed for the public and for the nutrition education components of HHS and USDA food programs. It is developed for use by policymakers and nutrition and health professionals. Additional audiences who may use Dietary Guidelinesinformation to develop programs, policies, and communication for the general public include businesses, schools, community groups, media, the food industry, and State and local governments.

Previous editions of the Dietary Guidelines focused primarily on individual dietary components such as food groups and nutrients. However, people do not eat food groups and nutrients in isolation but rather in combination, and the totality of the diet forms an overall eating pattern. The components of the eating pattern can have interactive and potentially cumulative effects on health. These patterns can be tailored to an individual’s personal preferences, enabling Americans to choose the diet that is right for them. A growing body of research has examined the relationship between overall eating patterns, health, and risk of chronic disease, and findings on these relationships are sufficiently well established to support dietary guidance. As a result, eating patterns and their food and nutrient characteristics are a focus of the recommendations in the 2015-2020 Dietary Guidelines.

The 2015-2020 Dietary Guidelines provides five overarching Guidelines that encourage healthy eating patterns, recognize that individuals will need to make shifts in their food and beverage choices to achieve a healthy pattern, and acknowledge that all segments of our society have a role to play in supporting healthy choices. These Guidelines also embody the idea that a healthy eating pattern is not a rigid prescription, but rather, an adaptable framework in which individuals can enjoy foods that meet their personal, cultural, and traditional preferences and fit within their budget. Several examples of healthy eating patterns that translate and integrate the recommendations in overall healthy ways to eat are provided.

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Key Recommendations provide further guidance on how individuals can follow the five Guidelines:

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TERMS TO KNOW:

Several terms are used to operationalize the principles and recommendations of the 2015-2020 Dietary Guidelines. These terms are essential to understanding the concepts discussed herein:

Eating pattern—The combination of foods and beverages that constitute an individual’s complete dietary intake over time. Often referred to as a “dietary pattern,” an eating pattern may describe a customary way of eating or a combination of foods recommended for consumption. Specific examples include USDA Food Patterns and the Dietary Approaches to Stop Hypertension (DASH) Eating Plan.

Nutrient dense—A characteristic of foods and beverages that provide vitamins, minerals, and other substances that contribute to adequate nutrient intakes or may have positive health effects, with little or no solid fats and added sugars, refined starches, and sodium. Ideally, these foods and beverages also are in forms that retain naturally occurring components, such as dietary fiber. All vegetables, fruits, whole grains, seafood, eggs, beans and peas, unsalted nuts and seeds, fat-free and low-fat dairy products, and lean meats and poultry—when prepared with little or no added solid fats, sugars, refined starches, and sodium—are nutrient-dense foods. These foods contribute to meeting food group recommendations within calorie and sodium limits. The term “nutrient dense” indicates the nutrients and other beneficial substances in a food have not been “diluted” by the addition of calories from added solid fats, sugars, or refined starches, or by the solid fats naturally present in the food.

Variety—A diverse assortment of foods and beverages across and within all food groups and subgroups selected to fulfill the recommended amounts without exceeding the limits for calories and other dietary components. For example, in the vegetables food group, selecting a variety of foods could be accomplished over the course of a week by choosing from all subgroups, including dark green, red and orange, legumes (beans and peas), starchy, and other vegetables.

An underlying premise of the Dietary Guidelines is that nutritional needs should be met primarily from foods. All forms of foods, including fresh, canned, dried, and frozen, can be included in healthy eating patterns. Foods in nutrient-dense forms contain essential vitamins and minerals and also dietary fiber and other naturally occurring substances that may have positive health effects. In some cases, fortified foods and dietary supplements may be useful in providing one or more nutrients that otherwise may be consumed in less-than-recommended amounts.

For most individuals, achieving a healthy eating pattern will require changes in food and beverage choices. This edition of the Dietary Guidelines focuses on shifts to emphasize the need to make substitutions—that is, choosing nutrient-dense foods and beverages in place of less healthy choices—rather than increasing intake overall. Most individuals would benefit from shifting food choices both within and across food groups. Some needed shifts are minor and can be accomplished by making simple substitutions, while others will require greater effort to accomplish.

Although individuals ultimately decide what and how much to consume, their personal relationships; the settings in which they live, work, and shop; and other contextual factors strongly influence their choices. Concerted efforts among health professionals, communities, businesses and industries, organizations, governments, and other segments of society are needed to support individuals and families in making dietary and physical activity choices that align with the Dietary Guidelines. Everyone has a role, and these efforts, in combination and over time, have the potential to meaningfully improve the health of current and future generations.

2015-2020 Dietary Guidelines for Americans at a Glance

The 2015-2020 Dietary Guidelines focuses on the big picture with recommendations to help Americans make choices that add up to an overall healthy eating pattern. To build a healthy eating pattern, combine healthy choices from across all food groups—while paying attention to calorie limits, too.

Check out the 5 Guidelines that encourage healthy eating patterns:

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Infographic: This is what three square meals look like under the new dietary guidelines

KEY:

Sodium:  

Saturated fats: 

Added sugars: 


Breakfast

(Los Angeles Times)

Bagel with peanut butter and banana
Whole wheat bagel 1/2 regular bagel (4 ounces)
Creamy peanut butter 2 tablespoons
Banana 1 medium
Coffee with milk and sugar
Whole milk 1/4 cup
Sugar 2 teaspoons
Fat-free strawberry yogurt 8 ounces

Total: 726 calories


Lunch

(Los Angeles Times)

Tuna salad sandwich with lettuce, tomato and mayo
100% whole wheat bread 2 slices
Canned tuna 2 ounces
Mayonnaise 2 teaspoons
Chopped celery 2 tablespoons
Lettuce 1 medium leaf
Carrots 4 baby carrots
Raisins 1/4 cup
Low-fat milk (1%) 1 cup

Total: 507 calories


Dinner

(Los Angeles Times)

Spaghetti and meatballs
Spaghetti 1 cup, cooked
Spaghetti sauce 1/4 cup
Diced tomatoes (canned, no salt added) 1/4 cup
Meatballs 3 medium meatballs
Parmesan cheese 1 tablespoon
Garden salad
Mixed greens 1 cup
Cucumber 3 slices
Avocado 1/4 cup, cubed
Garbanzo beans (canned, low sodium) 1/4 cup
Cheddar cheese (reduced fat) 3 tablespoons, shredded
Ranch dressing 1 tablespoon
Apple, raw 1/2 medium
Water, tap 1 cup

Total: 761 calories


Daily totals

Sodium 2,253 mg Daily limit: 2,300 mg
Saturated fats 153 calories (8% of total calories) Recommendation: 10% of calories
Added sugars 164 calories (8% of total calories) Recommendation: 10% of calories

Total:1995 calories

Originally Posted HERE & HERE

 

HB Sig

Over the past century, deficiencies of essential nutrients have dramatically decreased, many infectious diseases have been conquered, and the majority of the U.S. population can now anticipate a long and productive life. At the same time, rates of chronic diseases—many of which are related to poor quality diet and physical inactivity—have increased. About half of all American adults have one or more preventable, diet-related chronic diseases, including cardiovascular disease, type 2 diabetes, and overweight and obesity.

However, a large body of evidence now shows that healthy eating patterns and regular physical activity can help people achieve and maintain good health and reduce the risk of chronic disease throughout all stages of the lifespan. The 2015-2020 Dietary Guidelines for Americans reflects this evidence through its recommendations.

The Dietary Guidelines is required under the 1990 National Nutrition Monitoring and Related Research Act, which states that every 5 years, the U.S. Departments of Health and Human Services (HHS) and of Agriculture (USDA) must jointly publish a report containing nutritional and dietary information and guidelines for the general public. The statute (Public Law 101-445, 7 U.S.C. 5341 et seq.) requires that the Dietary Guidelines be based on the preponderance of current scientific and medical knowledge. The 2015-2020 edition of the Dietary Guidelines builds from the 2010 edition with revisions based on the Scientific Report of the 2015 Dietary Guidelines Advisory Committee and consideration of Federal agency and public comments.

The Dietary Guidelines is designed for professionals to help all individuals ages 2 years and older and their families consume a healthy, nutritionally adequate diet. The information in the Dietary Guidelines is used in developing Federal food, nutrition, and health policies and programs. It also is the basis for Federal nutrition education materials designed for the public and for the nutrition education components of HHS and USDA food programs. It is developed for use by policymakers and nutrition and health professionals. Additional audiences who may use Dietary Guidelinesinformation to develop programs, policies, and communication for the general public include businesses, schools, community groups, media, the food industry, and State and local governments.

Previous editions of the Dietary Guidelines focused primarily on individual dietary components such as food groups and nutrients. However, people do not eat food groups and nutrients in isolation but rather in combination, and the totality of the diet forms an overall eating pattern. The components of the eating pattern can have interactive and potentially cumulative effects on health. These patterns can be tailored to an individual’s personal preferences, enabling Americans to choose the diet that is right for them. A growing body of research has examined the relationship between overall eating patterns, health, and risk of chronic disease, and findings on these relationships are sufficiently well established to support dietary guidance. As a result, eating patterns and their food and nutrient characteristics are a focus of the recommendations in the 2015-2020 Dietary Guidelines.

The 2015-2020 Dietary Guidelines provides five overarching Guidelines that encourage healthy eating patterns, recognize that individuals will need to make shifts in their food and beverage choices to achieve a healthy pattern, and acknowledge that all segments of our society have a role to play in supporting healthy choices. These Guidelines also embody the idea that a healthy eating pattern is not a rigid prescription, but rather, an adaptable framework in which individuals can enjoy foods that meet their personal, cultural, and traditional preferences and fit within their budget. Several examples of healthy eating patterns that translate and integrate the recommendations in overall healthy ways to eat are provided.

The Guidelines

  1. Follow a healthy eating pattern across the lifespan. All food and beverage choices matter. Choose a healthy eating pattern at an appropriate calorie level to help achieve and maintain a healthy body weight, support nutrient adequacy, and reduce the risk of chronic disease.
  2. Focus on variety, nutrient density, and amount. To meet nutrient needs within calorie limits, choose a variety of nutrient-dense foods across and within all food groups in recommended amounts.
  3. Limit calories from added sugars and saturated fats and reduce sodium intake. Consume an eating pattern low in added sugars, saturated fats, and sodium. Cut back on foods and beverages higher in these components to amounts that fit within healthy eating patterns.
  4. Shift to healthier food and beverage choices. Choose nutrient-dense foods and beverages across and within all food groups in place of less healthy choices. Consider cultural and personal preferences to make these shifts easier to accomplish and maintain.
  5. Support healthy eating patterns for all. Everyone has a role in helping to create and support healthy eating patterns in multiple settings nationwide, from home to school to work to communities.

Key Recommendations provide further guidance on how individuals can follow the five Guidelines:

Key Recommendations

The Dietary Guidelines’ Key Recommendations for healthy eating patterns should be applied in their entirety, given the interconnected relationship that each dietary component can have with others.

Consume a healthy eating pattern that accounts for all foods and beverages within an appropriate calorie level.

A healthy eating pattern includes:[1]

  • A variety of vegetables from all of the subgroups—dark green, red and orange, legumes (beans and peas), starchy, and other
  • Fruits, especially whole fruits
  • Grains, at least half of which are whole grains
  • Fat-free or low-fat dairy, including milk, yogurt, cheese, and/or fortified soy beverages
  • A variety of protein foods, including seafood, lean meats and poultry, eggs, legumes (beans and peas), and nuts, seeds, and soy products
  • Oils

A healthy eating pattern limits:

  • Saturated fats and trans fats, added sugars, and sodium

Key Recommendations that are quantitative are provided for several components of the diet that should be limited. These components are of particular public health concern in the United States, and the specified limits can help individuals achieve healthy eating patterns within calorie limits:

  • Consume less than 10 percent of calories per day from added sugars[2]
  • Consume less than 10 percent of calories per day from saturated fats[3]
  • Consume less than 2,300 milligrams (mg) per day of sodium[4]
  • If alcohol is consumed, it should be consumed in moderation—up to one drink per day for women and up to two drinks per day for men—and only by adults of legal drinking age.[5]

In tandem with the recommendations above, Americans of all ages—children, adolescents, adults, and older adults—should meet the Physical Activity Guidelines for Americans to help promote health and reduce the risk of chronic disease. Americans should aim to achieve and maintain a healthy body weight. The relationship between diet and physical activity contributes to calorie balance and managing body weight. As such, the Dietary Guidelines includes a Key Recommendation to

  • Meet the Physical Activity Guidelines for Americans.[6]

Terms To Know

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An underlying premise of the Dietary Guidelines is that nutritional needs should be met primarily from foods. All forms of foods, including fresh, canned, dried, and frozen, can be included in healthy eating patterns. Foods in nutrient-dense forms contain essential vitamins and minerals and also dietary fiber and other naturally occurring substances that may have positive health effects. In some cases, fortified foods and dietary supplements may be useful in providing one or more nutrients that otherwise may be consumed in less-than-recommended amounts.

For most individuals, achieving a healthy eating pattern will require changes in food and beverage choices. This edition of the Dietary Guidelines focuses on shifts to emphasize the need to make substitutions—that is, choosing nutrient-dense foods and beverages in place of less healthy choices—rather than increasing intake overall. Most individuals would benefit from shifting food choices both within and across food groups. Some needed shifts are minor and can be accomplished by making simple substitutions, while others will require greater effort to accomplish.

Although individuals ultimately decide what and how much to consume, their personal relationships; the settings in which they live, work, and shop; and other contextual factors strongly influence their choices. Concerted efforts among health professionals, communities, businesses and industries, organizations, governments, and other segments of society are needed to support individuals and families in making dietary and physical activity choices that align with the Dietary Guidelines. Everyone has a role, and these efforts, in combination and over time, have the potential to meaningfully improve the health of current and future generations.

Figure ES-1.2015-2020 Dietary Guidelines for Americans at a Glance

The 2015-2020 Dietary Guidelines focuses on the big picture with recommendations to help Americans make choices that add up to an overall healthy eating pattern. To build a healthy eating pattern, combine healthy choices from across all food groups—while paying attention to calorie limits, too.

Check out the 5 Guidelines that encourage healthy eating patterns:

Healthy Byte: Healthy Mind Healthy Body

2016 1-8 M

Emotional intelligence is probably the most powerful yet undervalued trait in our society.

We believe in rooting our everyday functions in logic and reason, yet we come to the same conclusions after long periods of contemplation as we do in the blink of an eye. Our leaders sorely overlook the human element of our socio-political issues and I need not cite the divorce rate for you to believe that we’re not choosing the right partners (nor do we have the capacity to sustain intimate relationships for long periods of time).

It seems people believe the most intelligent thing to do is not have emotions at all. To be effective is to be a machine, a product of the age. A well-oiled, consumerist-serving, digitally attuned, highly unaware but overtly operational robot. And so we suffer.

Here are the habits of the people who have the capacity to be aware of what they feel. Who know how to express, process, dismantle and adjust their experience as they are their own locus of control. They are the true leaders, they are living the most whole and genuine lives, and it is from them we should be taking a cue. These are the things that emotionally intelligent people do not do.

1. They don’t assume that the way they think and feel about a situation is the way it is in reality, nor how it will turn out in the end.

They recognize their emotions as responses, not accurate gauges, of what’s going on. They accept that those responses may have to do with their own issues, rather than the objective situation at hand.

2. Their emotional base points are not external.

Their emotions aren’t “somebody else’s doing,” and therefore “somebody else’s problem to resolve.” Understanding that they are the ultimate cause of what they experience keeps them out of falling into the trap of indignant passivity: Where one believes that as the universe has done wrong, the universe will ultimately have to correct it.

3. They don’t assume to know what it is that will make them truly happy.

Being that our only frame of reference at any given time is what’s happened in the past, we actually have no means to determine what would make us truly happy, as opposed to just feeling “saved” from whatever we disliked about our past experiences. In understanding this, they open themselves up to any experience that their life evolves toward, knowing there are equal parts good and bad in anything.

4. They don’t think that being fearful is a sign they are on the wrong path.

The presence of indifference is a sign you’re on the wrong path. Fear means you’re trying to move toward something you love, but your old beliefs, or unhealed experiences, are getting in the way. (Or, rather, are being called up to be healed.)

5. They know that happiness is a choice, but they don’t feel the need to make it all the time.

They are not stuck in the illusion that “happiness” is a sustained state of joy. They allow themselves time to process everything they are experiencing. They allow themselves to exist in their natural state. In that non-resistance, they find contentment.

6. They don’t allow their thoughts to be chosen for them.

They recognize that through social conditioning and the eternal human monkey-mind, they can often be swayed by thoughts, beliefs and mindsets that were never theirs in the first place. To combat this, they take inventory of their beliefs, reflect on their origins, and decide whether or not that frame of reference truly serves them.

7. They recognize that infallible composure is not emotional intelligence.

They don’t withhold their feelings, or try to temper them so much as to render them almost gone. They do, however, have the capacity to withhold their emotional response until they are in an environment wherein it would be appropriate to express how they are feeling. They don’t suppress it, they manage it effectively.

8. They know that a feeling will not kill them.

They’ve developed enough stamina and awareness to know that all things, even the worst, are transitory.

9. They don’t just become close friends with anyone.

They recognize true trust and intimacy as something you build, and something you want to be discerning with whom you share. But they’re not guarded or closed as they are simply mindful and aware of who they allow into their lives and hearts. They are kind to all, but truly open to few.

10. They don’t confuse a bad feeling for a bad life.

They are aware of, and avoid, extrapolation, which is essentially projecting the present moment into the foreseeable future — believing that the moment at hand constitutes what your entire life amounted to, rather than just being another passing, transitory experience in the whole. Emotionally intelligent people allow themselves their “bad” days. They let themselves be fully human. It’s in this non-resistance that they find the most peace of all.

Originally Posted HERE

HB Sig