Healthy Byte: If You Have to Own One Piece of Workout Tool …

TOTALLY check out the video demonstration via link!

Originally Posted HERE

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Kettlebell flows, the continuously moving, strung-together routines used to burn fat and build muscle with a single implement, aren’t just useful because they allow you to get a ton of work done quickly and effectively. Flows also make it much easier to target different muscle groups in your body in one go.

Flows encourage full-body work by their very nature. You’ll often have need to move the kettlebell up, down, and around yourself in order to get to the next step in the series, which winds up involving a number of muscle groups.

When Eric Leija (a.k.a. Primal Swoledier) designs a flow, you can expect that there will likely be some lower and upper body combinations at play, like this routine he ran through for the Men’s Health Kettlehell program with fitness director Ebenezer Samuel, C.S.C.S.

The Power Lunge Flow uses unilateral movements, lunges, to work the lower body, then transitions to an upper body exercise, kettlebell halos. Grab your kettlebell and a partner and get ready to get moving.

Lunge Clean to Double-Halo

  • Start in an athletic stance with your kettlebell on the floor in front of you between your legs. Drop your butt and bend your knees (like a deadlift) to reach down and grab the implement with both hands.
  • Raise the kettlebell up into the goblet position, holding the weight in front of your chest. As you do this, lunge backward with one leg. Drive off the ground with your rear foot to step forward into the starting position with the weight on the ground before immediately lunging with the other leg. Return to the starting position with the kettlebell on the ground, keeping your hands on the handles and holding a squat.
  • Move your grip from the top of the kettlebell handle to grasp the sides. While maintaining the squat position, squeeze your biceps to curl the weight up to your chest. Stand straight up. Squeeze your abs and rotate the weight around your head to perform a halo, keeping it close to your body. Once you complete one orbit, change directions to go the other way.

Use the Power Lunge Flow as a finisher on a lower body or shoulder day, or schedule it as a standalone routine on a day you need to bang out a quick workout. Perform reps for 30 seconds and then rest 30 seconds. Repeat for 6 to 8 rounds.

Healthy Byte: Just MOVE!

BLOGGER NOTE: Your New Year’s resolution may include a fancy new diet and a new gym membership but haven’t we all been here before? … Repeatedly?

Try something really new this year and abandon the one-swoop-all-or-nothing sort of bravado and aim small, incremental changes to your daily life. Aim to be overall healthier instead of losing X amount of pounds. One of the common side effects of getting overall healthier is loosing weight but the change of focus will take the pressure off. Instead of relegating oneself to be a gym rat simply try to incorporate more physical movement into your everyday busy life by consciously looking for opportunities to squeeze in the extra physical activity. For example, taking the stairs instead of the escalator or elevator; grabbing a basket for groceries instead of a cart. The simpler the task, the easier to do regularly, and before you know it, your daily physical activity just increased and you are on your way to being overall more active.

Originally Posted HERE

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A burst of exercise cannot be too short, new guidance from the country’s top doctor suggests, as it calls on Britons to do what they can, when they can.

Until now, the advice had suggested that 10 minutes activity was the minimum required to achieve health benefits.

But today the chief medical officer urged people to fit as much movement as possible into their daily lives, by using the stairs rather than the lift, getting off the bus early and throwing themselves into their housework.

The new guidance keeps the recommendation that adults should carry out at least 150 minutes ‘moderate intensity’ activity – such as brisk walking or cycling – a week. Alternatively, 75 minutes of vigorous movement such as running is suggested.

But it suggests this can be done in long or short sessions, spread over the week however suits best.

And the new advice puts a stronger emphasis on “strengthening” activities such as weight lifting, carrying shopping or doing heavy gardening, especially for older adults. And it says any activity is better than none, urging those with inactive lives to take up dancing, bowls or tai chi.

The new guidance also endorses activities such as HIT (high intensity interval exercise) programmes which require very short bursts of exercise.  And it suggests that step counters, such as Fitbits might help adults to boost activity levels.

Prof Dame Sally Davies said the advice to the public is that when it comes to activity, “some is good, more is better”

“If physical activity were a drug we would refer to it as a miracle cure,” her report says.

She told The Daily Telegraph: “This is about building activity into every day life, Walking up a  flight or two of stairs instead of getting the lift. Getting off the bus early .. or pushing the vaccum cleaner around”.

Officials hope that by making the advice more flexible, those with sedentary habits are more likely to change their ways.

The advice does not set specific time targets for strength activities, but encourages Britons to ensure they carry out two such activities weekly.