Healthy Byte: Can’t Out-Gym Consistent Nutrition-Poor Choices

Originally Posted HERE

Image result for healthy nutrition

healthy diet doesn’t require a lot of money, newfangled appliances or subsisting on any kind of scheme that sounds like a gimmick. Because it’s true what they say about what seems too good to be true: Eating well means listening to that little voice inside that knows what healthy foods generally look like – fresh and recognizable in nature – and what they don’t – prepackaged and processed.

That sensibility may not fit so well with our on-demand culture, where we want results now – be it dinner or weight loss. But if you want a program that works for the long run, you’ll need a lifestyle you can live with and like. That means a diet that’s nutritious and delicious, but one that will take a bit of planning and commitment from you.

While staying lean is a big part of good health, weight lost doesn’t always equal health gained. That new diet that took inches off your waistline could be harming your health if it locks out or severely restricts entire food groups, relies on supplements with little scientific backing or clamps down on calories to an extreme.

“People are so desperate to lose weight that it’s really weight loss at any cost,” says Madelyn Fernstrom, founding director of the University of Pittsburgh Medical Center Weight Management Center. And when that desperation sets in, Fernstrom says, “normal thinking goes out the window.” Who cares how wacky or unhealthy a recommendation sounds to you? Pounds are coming off. You’re happy. But your body might not be. And that approach always guarantees weight regain.

With our Best Diets 2019 rankings, you can check the nutritional completeness and safety of 41 popular diets, from Atkins to the Fertility Diet to WW (Weight Watchers), in a detailed profile crafted for each one. (The profiles also cover scientific evidence, typical meals and much more.) And U.S. News’ Best Diets for Healthy Eating rankings give each diet a “healthiness” score from 5 (best) to 1 (worst) for safety and nutrition, with safety getting double weight; while you can modify a diet to some degree to adjust for nutritional imbalances or deficiencies, mere tweaking won’t make an unsafe diet safe.

Behind these scores are ratings by a panel of diet and nutrition experts assembled by U.S. News. They assessed the diets across seven categories, including the safety and nutritional completeness categories, for a series of nine different rankings lists. The Best Diets for Healthy Eating rankings overlap significantly with Best Diets Overall. Both give especially high marks to the DASHMINDTLCMediterraneanMayo Clinic and Volumetrics diets.

“The ones that get high scores in safety and in nutritional value – they’re very similar to each other,” says Andrea Giancoli, a registered dietitian who serves on the U.S. News expert panel. The recurring theme across the diets that excelled in healthiness is adequate calories supplied by a heavy load of vegetables, fruits and whole grains; a modest amount of lean protein, nonfat dairy and healthy fats; and an occasional treat. Plants are the foundation, and the menu is always built around minimally processed meals made from scratch.

Because plant-based eating patterns are so healthful and growing in popularity, U.S. News also offers a Best Plant-Based Diets category. And given the rise of food intolerances and sensitivities, we’ve included profiles of diets that are said to ease digestive distress – the gluten-free and low FODMAP diets. These are not ranked, however, as they are not intended for general dietary needs.

Very few diets on the Healthy Eating list are overtly unsafe or severely deficient nutritionally. Ten plans received healthiness scores below 3; these included the PaleoRaw FoodFastDukanAtkins and Whole30 diets. They’re simply too restrictive, say our experts, who call their nutritional qualities into question. The meat-heavy Paleo diet bans grains and dairy, so getting adequate calcium and vitamin D isn’t easy. Atkins, by severely curbing carbs, blows past recommended caps for total and saturated fat. Depending on your personal approach to the Raw Food Diet, you may shortchange yourself on calcium, vitamin B12 and vitamin D; its restrictive cooking rules also could put you at risk for eating raw or undercooked ingredients.

If you have reservations about a diet’s nutritional content or safety, listen to your body. Fatigue, sleeplessness, dizziness, aches – they’re all red flags. Says Fernstrom: “Losing weight is for good health, so you should feel more vital – not bad.”

Healthy Byte: Low-Carb vs. Low-Fat

Originally Posted HERE

Image result for biggest loser logo

It’s the staggering truth behind The Biggest Loser: On average, many of the contestants gained back most of the weight they lost on the show. Four were heavier than they were before going on TV, according to a 2016 National Institute of Health (NIH) study. It’s enough to make anyone give up those Crossfit classes in favor of a pack of cake rolls, but there’s a silver lining to that finding — it’s prompted all kinds of research and deeper analysis into major diet trends to find out what really works.

Increasingly, researchers and doctors are finding that the real key to weight loss isn’t low-carb or low-fat; it’s taking a much more personalized approach.

“Some people on a diet program lose 60 pounds and keep it off for two years, and other people follow the same program religiously, and they gain 5 pounds,” weight-loss researcher and Harvard cardiovascular disease prevention professor Frank Sacks toldTime in its June 5 cover story.

The Biggest Loser
NBC

For decades, we’ve followed a basic principle: Work out more, eat fewer calories, and the pounds will melt off. But, as Sacks’s example shows, the end result can vary widely from person to person, and — as The Biggest Loser study showed — it doesn’t mean you’ll keep the weight off, even if you maintain smaller portions later.

Ask Yourself This First.

The biggest thing, it seems, is testing out each method for a few months and noting how you feel during the diet. Is it a lifestyle that wears away at you? Are you always a little hangry? Those are warning signs.

“You need a plan that satisfies hunger,” iDiet founder and Tufts University nutrition professor Susan Roberts told Time. “Most diets fail because hunger erodes willpower.”

<p>This means you should <a href="http://www.redbookmag.com/body/healthy-eating/g3123/food-cravings/" target="_blank" data-tracking-id="recirc-text-link">tune into hunger/fullness cues</a> to determine whether you <i data-redactor-tag="i">reallllly</i> want that second chocolate chip cookie or not, and not just rely on what other people around you are eating or <a href="http://www.redbookmag.com/body/health-fitness/news/a46001/nickelodeon-bad-kids-health-new-study/" target="_blank" data-tracking-id="recirc-text-link">seductive marketing</a>. "Are you really hungry? Ask yourself whether a celery stick or apple sounds delicious — if not, you're probably not hungry," says <a href="http://plantbaseddietitian.com/" data-tracking-id="recirc-text-link" target="_blank">Julieanna Hever</a>, R.D., author of <i data-redactor-tag="i"><a href="http://www.amazon.com/The-Vegiterranean-Diet-Mediterranean-Plan/dp/0738217891?tag=bm01f-20&amp;ascsubtag=redbook.gallery.3565" data-tracking-id="recirc-text-link" target="_blank">The Vegiterranean Diet</a></i>.</p>

But Really, Is Low-Carb Better For Me?

Though some research shows low-carb diets have a slight edge over low-fat diets, you see on both sides of the spectrum widely varying results. In a 609-person study that divided people into both diet plans — “low-carb” being about 30 percent carbs and 45 percent fat, and “low-fat” being one with 29 percent fat and 48 percent carbs — each lost about the same amount. Neither group stood out for having a faster metabolism or more fat loss in the end. Even hypotheses that people who have a greater resistance to insulin would perform better on a low-carb diet didn’t hold true here, the Washington Post reported.

“YOU NEED A PLAN THAT SATISFIES HUNGER. MOST DIETS FAIL BECAUSE HUNGER ERODES WILLPOWER.”

What really worked, in this study, was changing your relationship with food. This, too, echoed Roberts’ statement. Instead of focusing on the ways you’re deprived — fewer calories, less fat, fewer carbs — paying greater attention to how you feel as you eat healthy may be key.

“Maybe if you just say ‘Eat as much as you want until you’re satiated, but eat this way until you’re satiated’ … I’d really like to look into that,” said nutrition scientist Christopher Gardner.

Here’s What You Can Learn From ‘The Biggest Loser.’

Okay, here’s where the news gets suckier: Remember those Biggest Losercontestants who gained weight? As the pounds crept back on, their metabolism didn’t speed back up. It stayed low, the NIH study found, burning about 700 fewer calories per day than it did when they started their weight loss journey.

It’s an unfortunate reality — and one to be aware of, because although The Biggest Loser‘s stars lose weight dramatically fast, Time found that even people who lose just a couple pounds a week can struggle with a sluggish metabolism. But there is a way to fight back. The National Weight Control Registry’s study of 10,000 people who’ve kept pounds off found a few things in common, if not a particular diet or meal plan:

  • They eat breakfast daily.
  • They weigh themselves once a week.
  • They watch less than 10 hours of TV a week.
  • They exercise about an hour a day (with walking the most popular method).

It’s a straightforward approach that sounds a lot like how the founders of Georgetown Cupcake, Sophie Kallinis LaMontagne and Katherine Kallinis Berman, lost a combined 100 pounds and kept it off for years. In the end, you just have to find what works for you — what you can comfortably tolerate — and stick to it, it seems.

Healthy Byte: Eating Healthy – It’s Not What You Think

NOTE: I’ve found that there’s a lot of misconceptions out there of what eating healthy looks like. Eating healthy in a way that can be maintained for the rest of your life is not about deprivation or writing off entire food groups at a time. Rather it’s trying to find the healthiest alternatives to what you like. At least that is my approach 4 years in weight loss maintenance.

(Photo: Getty Images/ Lauren Ahn)

Want to make your diet the picture of health ? Just follow some simple guidelines, conceived by registered dietitian Isabel Smith, to keep your meals, snacks, and treats (yes, ~*TrEaTs~*!) as healthy as can be:

(Photo: Lauren Ahn)

To make it even easier to clean up your diet, here are some stupid-simple recipes to get you through the day — just pin or screenshot them to reference the next time you’re hungry for…

Breakfast:

 (Photo: Lauren Ahn)

A Snack:

(Photo: Lauren Ahn)

Lunch:

(Photo: Lauren Ahn)

Dinner:

(Photo: Lauren Ahn)

A Treat:

(Photo: Lauren Ahn)

Originally Posted HERE

HB Sig