Zìjǐ Xiězuò (自己寫作) I Write for Myself: Me, According to Facebook

ORIGINAL CONTENT

I am fat, looking for a quick-fix weight loss supplement. And if the quick-fix doesn’t pan out then I will build a home gym and in the interim use shapewear to mold myself to the standard society has deemed physically appropriate. I am a young vegan mother looking for organic toys and Christian preschool, who is also looking for a online masters program in the fine arts, no wait, I am a seasoned man who needs supplements to enhance muscle mass. I have high interest in expensive food subscription boxes, love organic makeup, wants mensural underwear, love romance novels, purchase my wardrobe from home brew clothing brands, and perhaps most unfortunately, I am also inflicted with Cauliflower ear.

This is who I am according to the Facebook algorithm.

The Facebook algorithm is at a minimum somewhat inaccurate – at worst, laughable. As I sit here reviewing the ads for today, I rack my brain trying to recall what I could have possibly browsed that triggered an onslaught of romance novel ads. *shudders*

It occurred to me the hazards of these algorithms and how it can truly manipulate one’s perspective with just one-wrong-click. Once an end user clicks on one ad, one photo, one story, the algorithm awaiting in the shadows will begin to orchestrate similar ads, photos, and stories to bombard the end user’s news feed(s). Unless the end user is consciously aware of the system’s tendency to manipulate what is in the news feed and purposely & actively counter the AI by browsing other topics, the viscous cycle will only increase with ferocity.

It is foreseeable how the malleable or the lazy can be easily herded down the rabbit hole of conspiracies and be enveloped in a circle of unfounded rumors treated as facts. The malleable will take what they read at face value, questioning nothing, regardless of the source of the information. And from my experience being in various Facebook groups, the lazy will blindly rely on a bunch of strangers of varying degree of expertise instead of doing their own research from credible sources.

The lack of curiosity and the willingness to believe without question is a phenomena which I can’t quite comprehend. For me, I question everything and until I can confirm it for myself from multiple credible sources, I read everything with suspicion. Perhaps this is another benefit of being neglected as a child. I had to due without a parental figure to conveniently provide answers, instead I had to resort to finding the answers for myself, by myself.

Healthy Byte: It Just Take a Little

Image result for little exercise

Past research has indicated that metabolic function is critical for women to prevent cardiovascular disease and type II diabetes after they reach menopause. Now, according to new research from the University of Missouri, minimal exercise may be all it takes for postmenopausal women to better regulate insulin, maintain metabolic function and help prevent significant weight gain. These findings suggest that women can take a proactive approach and may not need to increase their physical activity dramatically to see significant benefits from exercise.

“Diseases and associated with metabolic dysfunction skyrocket after menopause,” said Vicki Vieira-Potter, assistant professor of nutrition and at MU. “The intent of this research was to determine what role exercise plays in protecting women, specifically less-active women, metabolically as they go through menopause.”

Vieira-Potter’s research team compared how exercise training maintained metabolic function in sedentary rats versus highly active rats. The rats were provided a running wheel which they could use as much or as little as they wanted. The sedentary rats only ran 1/5th of the distance as the highly active rats did; yet, the limited physical activity still maintained their metabolic function and normalized insulin levels. Moreover, the previously sedentary rats saw a 50 percent reduction in their fat tissue as a result of that small amount of exercise.

“These findings suggest that any physical activity, even just a small amount, can do wonders in terms of maintaining ,” Vieira-Potter said. “This is significant for as they deal with weight gain associated with menopause as well as the increased risk for disease.”

Vieira-Potter says sedentary women can be proactive as they enter menopause by:

  • Going on regular walks with friends;
  • Taking the stairs rather than the elevator;
  • Joining beginners’ fitness programs;
  • Monitoring through use of fitness trackers.

“Voluntary running attenuates metabolic dysfunction in ovariectomized low-fit rats,” recently was published in Medicine and Science in Sports and Exercise. Jaume Padilla, assistant professor; and Jill Kanaley, professor and associate chair; in the department of nutrition and exercise physiology co-authored the study. Other contributors from MU were Young-Min Park, a former graduate student; Terese Zidon, graduate student; Rebecca Welly, lab manager in the department of nutrition and exercise physiology; and Frank Booth, professor of biomedical sciences. Researchers from the University of Michigan medical school and the University of Kansas medical center also contributed to the study.

Originally Posted HERE

HB Sig