Healthy Byte: Walking vs Running for Weight Loss

running vs walking calories burned

Two weeks ago, I began planning an update to a walking vs running calorie-burn article that I had written for Runner’s World magazine in 2005. When that article subsequently appeared on the RunnersWorld.com website, it attracted a lot of interest and comments. Some of those comments displayed the widespread confusion and outright disbelief that’s common to this topic.

Most people believe that walking one mile and running one mile burn the same number of calories. You know, a mile is a mile is a mile. Sounds reasonable. But it doesn’t hold up to scientific scrutiny.
So I thought I’d write another blog post to clarify the confusion as much as I can. Fortunately, I got some help. A group of researchers from California State University have just published a new run vs walk paper.It’s the best one yet, and it confirms (to a very high degree) the data I presented in 2005, which was mostly based on this paper. Even better, this group of investigators have included the “after burn” in their calculations. That’s a first.

It’s also entirely appropriate. Whether you finish your workout by collapsing on the grass, drinking a smoothie, or taking a shower, your body continues burning more calories than usual until it returns to its basal metabolic rate. These calories are “free,” yet real.

The subjects in the new study were 15 male college students, and 15 female, with an average weight of 156 lbs. One day they ran a treadmillmile in 10:00 minutes; another day they walked a mile in 18:36. Afterwards, they sat quietly for 30 minutes, by which time their metabolic rate had returned to normal.

Table A: Calories Burned Per 1-Mile Walk vs 1-Mile Run For A 156-lb Subject

WALK* RUN**
CALS/MILE 88.9 112.5
CALS/MINUTE 4.78 11.26
AFTER-BURN/MILE 21.7 46.1
NEW TOTAL/MILE 110.6 158.6
CALS/MINUTE 5.95 15.86

*one mile walk in 18:36; ** one mile run in 10:00

I always add a calories/minute result to these calculations, because, frankly, it’s how most of us live our lives. We only have so many workout minutes in a day or week, and we’d like to know what the payoff is. Clearly, running burns more than twice as many calories per minute (11.25) as walking (4.78). This difference increases when you consider the after-burn.

However, you have to be careful about the way you apply the after-burn. You only get one after-burn per workout, not one per mile. So if you run five miles, your after-burn might still be just 46.1 calories (or minimally higher). You don’t get to multiply five by 158.6 calories/mile, which would yield 793 calories burned. Instead, you should multiply five by 112.5, and then add 46.1. That yields 608.6.

Probably it’s smartest to just multiply your total miles by 112.5, and consider the after-burn a nice little bonus. To increase your bonus, run faster during your workout. One recent study showed that a modestly-hard workout could produce 190 after-burn calories in the following 14 hours.

Lastly, I like to produce calorie-burn charts that adjust to your body weight. As noted, the above chart only works if you weigh 156.2 pounds. Which you probably don’t. Here’s a very simple chart that lets you compute your personal calorie-burn per mile per pound.

Table B: Your Calorie Burn Per Mile (Or Minute) Walk vs Run

WALK RUN
CALORIES/MILE .57 x wt in lbs .72 x wt in lbs
CALORIES/MIN .03 x wt in lbs .07 x wt in lbs

To use the above, simply multiply your weight (in pounds) by the number shown. For example, if you weigh 188 lbs, you will burn about 107 calories (188 x .57) when you walk a mile, and about 135 calories (188 x .72) when you run a mile.

As you can see, running a mile burns roughly 26 percent more calories than walking a mile. Running a minute (or 30 minutes, or an hour, etc.) burns roughly 2.3 times more calories than the same total time spent walking.

OK, now a few caveats. These calculations are all derived from an “average” weight of the subjects; there may be individual variations. Also, age and gender make a difference, though quite a modest one. Your weight is by far the biggest determinant of your calorie burn per mile. When you look at per-minute burn, your pace (your speed) also makes a big difference.

These calculations aren’t meant to be precise. They are good approximations, and much more accurate than the old chestnut: You burn 100 calories per mile.

Lastly the calculations only apply to walkers doing an 18:36 pace and runners doing a 10:00 pace. Running faster or slower than 10:00 pace doesn’t make much difference in your calorie-burn per mile. (But has a major impact on your burn per minute.)

Walking is a different kind of animal. Increases in walking speed dramatically raise calorie burn per mile as well as per minute. Indeed, at about 12:30 per mile, walking hits a point where it burns about the same calories/mile as running. Walk faster than 12:30 and you will burn more calories/mile than running at 10:00 pace.

However, almost no one but competitive race walkers goes faster than 12:30 per mile. Indeed, when I look out my front window at walkers circling the block, very few are walking faster than 18:36. Most are in the 18:00 to 20:00 range—great exercise for the elderly and the overweight, but not a big calorie-burn activity.

Finally, this time around I haven’t made a distinction between net calorie burn and gross calorie burn, which is what you’ll get by doing the math shown above. The net versus gross argument is important to some people, but, frankly, it’s almost never reported in health and journalism circles, and is probably more complicated than most people want to know.

Do what you can to burn as many calories as possible in exercise and daily living. That’s the ticket to good health and weight. (Some individuals take this too far, but they are in the distinct minority, and don’t constitute a national public health crisis. I just read a health economics paper that estimates 20 percent of national health care costs are related to obesity-related illnesses.)

Originally Posted HERE

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Healthy Byte: Weight Loss Strategies for the Everyday Folks

Image result for regular people getting healthy

For some reason, people treat changing calendars as an event that marks the beginning of a new lifestyle, usually one that includes a focus on health. Sure enough, the two most popular resolutions are “losing weight” and “staying fit and healthy.” It’s pretty much a given that come January 1, gyms will be slammed and salad bars will be crammed.

But what about the folks who aren’t ready to dive into something extremely demanding, like CrossFit five days a week or a seriously restrictive diet plan? Are there less-challenging, yet still effective ways to lose weight? Absolutely!

 

Nix the sodas and fruit juices
Here’s something to think about: if you currently drink two servings of soda or juice a day, and you simply stopped drinking it right now, opting instead for healthier alternatives like sparkling water or just plain water, you’d easily be able to eliminate 300+ calories from your day and shed almost 1lb a week without any additional exercise.

2016-01-06-1452098034-4041274-weightmain.jpgCredit: Anthony Humphreys/Thrillist

Simplify your coffee
Since coffee contains caffeine, it can stimulate fat burn and weight loss. Unfortunately, coffee loses all of its weight-loss potential when you cram it with unhealthy additives like super-sweet syrups and sugars. End result: a once-healthy black coffee becomes a fattening sugarbomb. So here’s a simple solution for coffee-lovers who also want to lose weight: start taking your coffee black, and if you really can’t stand the bitterness, go for a naturally low-calorie sweetener, like stevia. Bottom line, by going au natural with your coffee, you’ll tighten up your waistline.

2016-01-06-1452098285-8879627-weight2.jpgCredit: Flickr/Jpellgen

Reduce your carbs three days per week
Not all carbs are the devil, but eating a diet high in refined carbs (think white rice, pasta, cereal, bread) can cause elevated blood sugar and insulin. End result: eating a diet high in refined carbs can make you fat and sick— and it can make it harder to lose weight.

 

Originally Posted HERE

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Healthy Byte: Lose Weight for Life

There’s no fad diet or miracle pill that will change your body overnight, but losing weight is within your reach — it just might take a little longer than you’d like. Consider this: when you lose weight at a slow and healthy pace, you’ll be more likely to keep it off for good. If you’re done with the days of yo-yo dieting, these 10 tips are the emotional stepping stones to a healthier lifestyle.

  1. Start small: Chances are, if in the past, you’ve tried to change everything all at once, few of your intentions have stuck for good. The answer to staying committed for the long haul is to start small. Make one positive shift every week, instead of overwhelming yourself with a bunch of changes at once.
  2. Find out what fuels you: Whatever your true motivation is, tap into it, and use it. Is it about fitting into a ton of clothes tucked away in the back of your closet? Is it about being lighter and more active, so you can run around outside with your kids? Getting serious about your long-term goals will keep you committed to your lifestyle change.
  3. Don’t focus on deprivation: According to celebrity trainer Heidi Powell, anytime you deprive yourself of food, or of anything, “all you want is what you can’t have!” Take your mind-set away from sacrifice and start celebrating the fact that you’re cultivating a healthier, happier, more energized life.
  4. Learn to love consistency: When you have a regular mealtime schedule and fridge full of fresh produce and healthy staples, making choices that support your goals won’t feel like a constant battle. Remember, this isn’t a quick fix — this is a lifestyle change. After a few weeks, these things will feel like second nature.
  5. Find healthy foods you love: It’s true! Healthy food that supports weight loss can also be delicious! If you’ve been on a solid sugar- and salt-laden diet for years, it will take a little getting used to. But sooner than you think, those cravings start to dissipate, and clean, natural foods sound much more palatable.
  6. Seek out exercise you enjoy: Heading to the gym shouldn’t feel like pulling teeth. Keep on trying new group fitness classes, cardio machines, and different styles of exercise. When you find that one activity that flies by and feels like fun, you’ll know you’ve met your match.
  7. Plan ahead for indulgences whenever possible: Occasionally enjoying a sweet treat or special meal out are essential parts of sustainable weight-loss plan. When you know you’re going to want a burger at your BBQ or an ice cream cone when you’re at the beach next weekend, keep your diet extra clean leading up to your special indulgence. It will make the whole experience that much sweeter.
  8. Have compassion for yourself: Sometimes, we’re triggered by foods around us, we haven’t planned ahead, and slipups happen. Instead of being hard on yourself after eating a food that’s “off-limits,” forgive yourself, and move on. When you treat yourself with kindness, you’ll be able to bounce back and stay on track. Let’s skip the downward spiral of a whole day (or week) filled with junk food, shall we?
  9. Keep setting new goals: As you’re evolving and progressing on your weight-loss journey, your goals have got to keep up! There’s so much to celebrate beyond that number on the scale, and setting specific and personal minigoals like training for a race (or slipping into that pair of old jeans) will help you stay connected.
  10. Picture the new you: If you’ve struggled with your weight for a long time, it can be hard to visualize a new, healthier life. You might not be able to find the words right now, but creating a tangible reminder, like a healthy vision board covered in inspirational images, will help you start to recognize what your dreams look like.

Originally Posted HERE

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Healthy Byte: Workouts to Avoid to Lose Weight

NOTE: Workout is a great way to get healthy but workout alone without any changes to eating choices will not yield the robust results if the goal is to lose weight. There simply isn’t enough hours in the day to “out-gym” poor eating choices so keep this in mind reading this article. Enjoy!

We encourage all types of fitness, for more reasons than just weight loss. While weight loss is an awesome side effect of working out and living a healthier lifestyle, exercise can benefit your brain, your mood, your sleep, and your overall health, too!

However, if you’re focusing on dropping pounds, are there types of exercises you should flat-out avoid? We asked certified personal trainer John Rowley — International Sports Science Association (ISSA) director of wellness and founder of UX3 Nutrition — for his opinion on the matter. While we still encourage anyone to give these workouts a shot (in fact, we love all of them!), these four may not give you the results you’re looking for if weight loss is your top priority.

  1. CrossFit: “CrossFit is number one on the hit list,” Rowley said in an email. “The risk-to-results ratio just isn’t there.” If you’re just beginning your weight-loss journey, you likely won’t have the strength to get an effective workout without injuring yourself. “It’s very popular, and I can see how fun and challenging it is,” he noted. “But the way the exercises are done is very dangerous, especially for someone not in tiptop shape.”
  2. Yoga: Rowley explained that yoga “has a lot of benefits, but losing weight is not one of them.” Although you’ll gain strength and tone up, if you’re aiming to shed pounds, “you want to work as much of your body as possible to lose weight and to stimulate your metabolism,” and Rowley said yoga is not the most effective way to do so.
  3. Indoor Cycling: While indoor cycling classes are great for exercise veterans, Rowley said, “they can get out of control as well,” and the format of the classes can put you at risk for injury. “The rooms can get too hot, the movements can be too aggressive for some, and any vigorous exercise will make you hungry.” More on that hunger in the next point . . .
  4. Cardio-Only Routines: Rowley said these should be avoided if your only goal is weight loss. Why? The munchies. “Cardio will help burn calories but can often make you hungry, leading to excessive calorie-consuming after workouts,” putting you at a higher risk for undoing your progress. Additionally, if you’re only doing cardio and not balancing with strength training, it can lead to muscle loss. “The loss of muscle destroys your metabolism; if you are going to do cardio, do it in conjunction with a well thought-out weight training workout.”

Again, we love (and do) each of these workouts — and you absolutely can lose weight doing any of them. But if your number one goal is weight loss, Rowley warned, you might want to reprioritize your workout schedule.

So what should you do? “The only way for lasting, healthy weight loss that will change your body composition is through resistance training,” Rowley said. “Lifting weights stimulates your muscles; your muscles burn calories even when you are eating and resting.” We encourage you to be open to all types of workouts — get comfortable with movement of all types! But start with a good, healthy balance of strength training (as recommended by this trainer) and a bit of cardio to help build up your endurance so you can keep shedding pounds and crush your goals.

Originally Posted HERE

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Healthy Byte: Side Effect of Massive Weight Loss

simone weight loss

Simone Pretscherer  – Read about her amazing story HERE

You did it. You logged the woman-hours at the gym and stocked your fridge with enough kale and Greek yogurt to slenderize an elephant. Or maybe you went under the knife and are now putting in major effort to maintain. Regardless, the numbers on the scale are at super-satisfying lows. There’s just one teensy, tiny (ahem, giant, looming) issue: Your skin didn’t get the “I’ve got a new body now” memo.

Kelly Coffey’s skin sure didn’t. Coffey, a personal trainer, wound up with some serious excess after losing 170 pounds from gastric bypass surgery. “It happened very quickly; I was sort of shocked at how much there was,” she says.

For her own body, Coffey went the tummy-tuck route for extra skin around her midsection and amped up her weight-lifting routine for her arms, legs, and back. (Looking for a total-body toning workout that will fit into your busy schedule? How does 10 minutes a day sound? Try Prevention’s Fit in 10 DVD today!) But which route is right for you? Here are 5 ways to deal with loose skin—surgical and not—after a serious drop in pounds.

Embrace the Weights

(Photo: Getty Images)

Sadly, gaining muscle isn’t going to actually remove any extra skin. But toning up could help you appear more taut after weight loss. The heavier the weights you lift, the better, suggests Coffey. (Here are 10 of the best strength-training moves for women over 50.) “Don’t be afraid to lift heavy weights; it takes a lot less time to achieve the same degree of muscle with heavier weights, and the quicker I built muscle, the faster I toned up,” says Coffey. To make sure you’re doing it correctly and safely, enlist a professional’s guidance when you’re first starting out.

Update Your Support System

(Photo: Getty Images)

Don’t worry; we don’t want you to get new friends. (Unless they’re totally toxic—butthat’s another story.) A great bra and panties can go a long way, suggests Claudine DeSola, a stylist at Caravan Stylist Studios in New York. “Good intimates are a great way of helping conceal excess skin in the belly area,” says DeSola. Opt for bras with front closures and thicker bands, which give a cleaner, smoother look to your back. Trade in your bikini-cut panties for some high-cut briefs while you’re at it, and don’t shy away from Spanx—they’ll make everything feel a bit more secure, says DeSola. (Thanks, Tina Fey, for showing we don’t have to be ashamed to enlist a little Lycra every now and then.)

Come Out of Hiding
Don’t you want to congratulate yourself with an updated wardrobe? Have fun with form-fitting layers, suggests DeSola. “A slightly fitted tee with a sweater on top and a thick belt is a great way to cinch your waist,” says DeSola. Mid-rise jeans are another great option—ones that hit right below the belly button are the sweet spot for a perfect fit. Looking for something a bit more fun? Try a wrap dress in a bold color like red. It should hit at (or just below) the knee, and pairing it with heels will make your legs look longer and leaner.

Ditch the Negativity

(Photo: Getty Images)

Fact: Losing a ton of weight won’t automatically reserve you a spot on the Victoria’s Secret runway (and let’s be real—would you want to perpetuate that skinny ideal anyway?). “When we lose weight, we’re not headed toward a different body; we’re headed toward a smaller body,” Coffey says. Instead of hating on that extra skin, wear it as a badge of honor—you made a commitment to living a healthier, more active life, and loose skin is just proof that you did what so many other people have trouble doing. “Excess skin isn’t the terrible tragedy that so many of us think it will be; it’s just another one of the details about your body that makes you you,” says Coffey. It’s a symbol of your journey—and that’s something to be proud of.

Make Like a Snake
When it comes to excess skin after weight loss, the hard, cold truth is that going under the knife is the only surefire way to totally get rid of it. And if you’ve tried everything else and still aren’t even remotely satisfied with your appearance (or if your extra skin is getting irritated), it’s probably time to talk with a plastic surgeon about your options. Extra stuff around the midsection can be removed through an abdominoplasty—also known as a tummy tuck—according to Raul Rosenthal, MD, president of the American Society for Metabolic and Bariatric Surgery. “Because the skin has stretched over so many years, it’s very difficult for that skin to go back to where it was before; it will not return to its natural consistency or elasticity,” says Rosenthal. According to him, patients who undergo plastic surgery following extreme weight loss not only experience a better quality of life, but they’re also more likely to keep the weight off. One last note: Before you choose to shed your skin for good, make sure you talk to your insurance provider, as most don’t cover such procedures.

Originally Posted HERE

PERSONAL NOTE: Like many things there are very different school of thoughts in regards to weight loss & excess skin. Some believe that the rate of weight loss maybe the culprit to excess skin (HERE). Others believe that perhaps the ‘excess skin’ is not excess skin at all but body fat because they lost more muscle than fat during weight loss phase (HERE). Yet, there are those who believe that the human skin elasticity has a definitive limit and the rate of weight loss has very little bearing (HERE). Regardless which camp one may believe in, I think there is some truth to all the schools of thought and we just have to decide which makes more sense to us individually based on how overweight we were, age, and method of weight loss (ie. crash diet, heavy cardio, surgery etc).

For me personally, I lost a total of 39 lbs over 18 months give or take. When I reached my first goal weight within 8 months doing strictly long stretches of cardio, I had a fair amount of ‘excess skin’ in the abdomen area. I reached my second goal within the following year and started to dial down the cardio and incorporated strength training. My weight have relatively remained with 1-2 lbs for the last 2 yrs but my ‘excess skin’ has dissipated significantly and overall I look ‘thinner.’ After reading the various school of thought (above) I do see some validity to perhaps that some of the 39 lbs I lost included a fair amount of muscle. Since I really didn’t get serious about strength training to tone & define until within the last 18 mths or so, the theory that building muscle helps ‘fill in’ to make the skin look more taut is very plausible in my case. Again, this is just my own personal thought based on my own experience and it can be very different for someone else.

“A big part of tightening loose skin is building muscle. The reason for this is simple.

There are two layers of tissue underneath your skin: fat and muscle, both of which press up against your skin and keep it from sagging loosely.

When you gain a large amount of weight, your skin must expand quite a bit to accommodate the increase in body size. When you lose the fat, however, and especially when you lose it quickly, your skin doesn’t necessarily shrink at the same rate as your fat cells. This imbalance can lead to loose skin.

Furthermore, many people use various forms of starvation dieting as well as large amounts of cardio to lose fat, which also causes significant muscle loss, further expanding the void between the skin and the underlying tissue.

The end result is a reduced body fat percentage but a small, soft physique with sagging skin. The “skinny fat” look, as it’s called.

Building muscle is the solution to all these woes because it literally fills in the looseness in the skin, creating a visibly tighter, healthier look.”

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Healthy Byte: Can’t Out Gym Poor Eating Choices

Aside from those who has youth on their side or are the lucky few to be genetically programmed to repel fat, the above statement holds true for most. And it is perhaps the most difficult hard truth to accept and implement. The assumption of exercise negates everything & anything one consume is folly. Below is an excerpt from an expert explaining why it is folly:

But what many people don’t realize is that it’s much easier to cut excess calories from your diet than it is to burn them off with extra activity, says Natalie Digate Muth, MD, RDN, senior adviser for health-care solutions for the American Council on Exercise. Take a 20-ounce bottle of Coca-Cola, for example. It may only take a few minutes to guzzle those 240 calories, but you’d have to walk or run nearly 2½ miles to burn them off.

So unless you’re a professional athlete, you’re probably not exercising enough to cancel out an all-you-can-eat diet.

SOURCE: HERE

Still not a believer? Here’s more expert explanation:

Narula said that because of misconceptions about weight loss, people often overeat and assume that they can burn off the excess calories at the gym. But “it’s easier to take out the calories than to try and burn them off,” she said. For example, for an individual with a daily caloric intake of 3,500 to drop a pound of fat, it would take one and a half times as long to lose weight through exercise burning 200 calories per day than through cutting 500 calories a day from their diet.

“That’s either an hour or an hour and a half at the gym on the treadmill, on the rowing machine; or it’s cutting out a couple sodas, a bagel with cream cheese, a cupcake,” Narula said.

SOURCE: HERE

The bottom line is, unless you are Dwayne ‘The Rock’ Johnson who’s job is to stay fit and gets paid to invest hours a day at the gym, for most of us everyday folks there simply isn’t enough hours in the day to out exercise poor eating choices.

 

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As Albert Einstein definitely said, “For every cheeseburger ingested, an equal and opposite cheeseburger must occur somewhere.” What Einstein knew intuitively was that diet matters; what goes in must go out, or else it will turn into love handles. That’s just science.

So we decided to look at the number of calories in 13 commonly consumed foods and drinks, and evaluate how many steps (and miles) it would take to walk off those calories. We used an average of 2,000 steps for a mile, and about 89 calories burned per mile walked. No, these are not perfect measurements; yes, these estimates will depend on your height, weight, gender, atmospheric conditions, etc.

Next time you’re thinking of grabbing an on-the-go meal, better make sure your boots were made for walking.

Credit: Nina Gonzales/Thrillist

Credit: Nina Gonzales/Thrillist

Credit: Nina Gonzales/Thrillist

Credit: Nina Gonzales/Thrillist

Credit: Nina Gonzales/Thrillist

Credit: Nina Gonzales/Thrillist

Credit: Nina Gonzales/Thrillist

 

Originally Posted HERE

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Healthy Byte: Forty Pounds to Freedom (Cliff Notes Version)

WAY BACK WHEN:

EPSON MFP image

2000

This was my stats for about 3 years after the birth of my second child. In my mind, this was what moms are suppose to look like, be like. There were no time for anything else but to live & eat this way.

156 lbs BMI: 32.6 [Obesity = BMI of 30 or greater]

Your BMR is: 1319 Calories/Day

Your TDEE is: 1517 Calories/Day

Eating Habits: (actual consumption 3000+)

White or fried rice every day – twice a day (lu & dinner); Pizza & Pasta 2-3 days a week; Chips, Chip & Dip for snack 5 days out of the week; Fast Food: Burgers, Nachos, Burritos, Subs – White bread; High sugary drinks – Starbucks 5-6 times a week – Sometimes twice a day Drink of choice: White Chocolate Mocha – Grande (16 oz), Whole Milk w/Whip Cream (500 calories each), Soda, Lemonade  made w/4 CUPS of sugar in every batch = 3,092 calories per pitcher) 2-3 (8oz) cups everyday is about 386.5 calories each; Lots of fried foods; Beef almost exclusively; Food generally was drowned in gravy or some sort of sauce or condiment ie. ketchup; no veggies; no fruits, no water)

Ate Out: 3-4 times a week

Meal Frequency: Lunch & Dinner only (85% Refined Carbs 5% High Fat Protein 10%Sugar/Fat)

Habit: Ate until I couldn’t move >50% of the time

Activity Level: Zero consistent exercise or physical activity – tried to walk once a or twice a week pushing the kiddos in a stroller in the park … usually last 2-3 weeks then ‘life’ got in the way.

THEN:

EPSON MFP image

2004

My ‘baby weight’ for about the next 12 years after the birth of my second child. LOL I had tried a series of yo-yo quick fixes to losing weight. Anything from popping diet pills to joining the weight loss group at the gym. Nothing stuck because I wanted immediate results but didn’t want to be bothered with the nitty gritty details like nutrition or consistency or patience – working full time & mother of two, who had time for THAT?! In my mind, this was the price of being a working mother and I had all but made peace with it.

133 lbs BMI: 27.8 [Overweight = 25–29.9]

Your BMR is: 1154 Calories/Day

Your TDEE is: 1327 Calories/Day

Eating Habits: (actual consumption 2000+)

White rice every day for dinner only; Pizza & Pasta 2 days a week; Fast Food: ‘healthier options’ tacos, Burrito bowls, Subs wheat bread; Pork & breaded fish fillets; Limited condiments to ketchup (tomato based = veggie = healthy); snacked every night (ice cream, chocolate) after dinner because I was overall eating ‘healthier’; no veggies; no fruits, some water)

Ate Out: 2-3 times a week

Meal Frequency: Lunch sometimes & HUGE Dinner always (65% Refined Carbs 20% High Fat Protein 15% Sugar/Fat)

Habit: Ate until I was stuffed >50% of the time

Activity Level: No regular exercise or physical activity other than taking kiddos to the park & pushing them on swings about once a week.

NOW:

2015 8-11 Now

2015

I had surrendered completely to being overweight. After all I wasn’t obese – I can fit into rides at the amusement park. I can play with the kids without being out of breath. I was the average mom size. Even though I couldn’t bare to look at myself in the mirror for any length of time, avoided the camera like the plague, and dreaded clothes shopping, I ate mostly whatever I wanted with total disregard to portion size. It was my miserable-happiness. All was copacetic until I got a new job.

The new employer incentivized employees to get their annual physicals by reducing employee monthly health insurance contribution – for a family of four that was a hefty discount so off I went! My first annual physical since leaving the Army some 14 yrs prior. And boy did I get the shock of my life! My LDL was 115 (should be under 100) and my blood glucose was 101 (70-99 is norm). I was technically pre-diabetic. What a horrifying thought. Having been through training to sell diabetic medication, I saw first hand the complications of type 2 diabetes can do. Amputation, blindness, kidney, nerve, the list goes on and that scared me so bad that I downloaded MFP the very same day of the results and was bound & determined that I was going to give 110% effort in preventing the preventable. My goal was to get healthy!

95 lbs BMI: 19.9 [Normal weight = 18.5–24.9]

Your BMR is: 967 Calories/Day

Your TDEE is: 1498 Calories/Day

Eating Habits: (actual consumption 1100 – 1400)

Pizza no more than once a week; Chicken, Pork, & salmon – nothing breaded; Condiments: Fat free ranch, Fat free miracle whip, House Italian with lots of spices like cayenne pepper, paprika, chilli powder, & garlic for bold flavors; After dinner snack: if I’m hankering for a snack I opt for a toasted whole wheat english muffin w/ PB&J; Veggies with lunch & dinner; Whole Wheat everything; Fruits with breakfast & lunch; Green tea (w/fat free milk & sugar) & water only – No more than 10 calories a day from what I drink is my personal rule) Once or twice a year I have a Short (8 oz) White Chocolate Mocha Skinny (nonfat milk), No whipped cream. 175 calories and because it is a treat I really enjoy savoring it.

Eat Out: 1-2 times a month

Meal Frequency: Small Brkfst (just not a breakfast person), Solid Lunch, Good Size Dinner (75% veggies 24% Lean Protein 1% Condiments)

Habit: Eat until I am no longer hungry >90% of the time

Activity Level: Exercise 6 Days a Week: 30 minutes Cardio & 15-20 minutes Strength Trng

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